Kobus Kemp March 23, 2016 No Comments

What is ‘Market Sentiment’

Market sentiment is the overall attitude of investors toward a particular security or larger financial market. Market sentiment is the feeling or tone of a market, or its crowd psychology, as revealed through the activity and price movement of the securities traded in that market. For example, rising prices would indicate a bullish market sentiment, while falling prices would indicate a bearish market sentiment. Market sentiment is also called “investor sentiment” and is not always based on fundamentals.

BREAKING DOWN ‘Market Sentiment’

Market sentiment is important to day traders and technical analysts, who use technical indicators to attempt to measure and profit from the short-term price changes often caused by investors’ attitudes toward a security. Market sentiment is also important to contrarian investors, who like to trade in the opposite direction of the prevailing sentiment. For example, if everyone is buying, a contrarian would sell.

Read more: Market Sentiment Definition | Investopedia http://www.investopedia.com/terms/m/marketsentiment.asp#ixzz43ij2AP2K
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Read more: Market Sentiment Definition | Investopedia http://www.investopedia.com/terms/m/marketsentiment.asp#ixzz43iix63tY
Follow us: Investopedia on Facebook

About Commitments of Traders – as per www.oanda.com

The Commitments of Traders (COT) is a report issued by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC). It aggregates the holdings of participants in the U.S. futures markets (primarily based in Chicago and New York), where commodities, metals, and currencies are bought and sold. The COT is released every Friday at 3:30 Eastern Time, and reflects the commitments of traders for the prior Tuesday.

The COT provides a breakdown of aggregate positions held by three different types of traders: “commercial traders” (in forex, typically hedgers), “non-commercial traders” (typically, large speculators), and “nonreportable” (typically, small speculators).

The Net Non-Commercial Positions shown are from contracts held by large speculators, mainly hedge funds and banks trading currency futures for speculation purposes. Speculators are not able to deliver on contracts and have no need for the underlying commodity or instrument, but buy or sell with the intention of closing their “sell” or “buy” position at a profit, before the contract becomes due. These contracts, sold in lot sizes that vary by currency, net out to have either a surplus of buy requests (positive values in the chart) or sell requests (negative values).

The Open Interest represents the total number of contracts, including both buy and sell positions, outstanding between all market participants. That is, the total of all futures and/or option contracts entered into and not yet offset by a transaction, by delivery, by exercise, and so on. These figures are not netted, but instead show overall volume (that is, interest).

Note: In the futures market, the foreign currency is always quoted directly against the U.S. dollar. In the spot forex market, some currencies are quoted the opposite way. For consistency, these graphs provide futures market position data on a reverse axis (with negative values above the 0-axis) whenever the quote order is opposite the spot forex notation. This is the case for the Swiss Franc, for example, which in forex is quoted against the US dollar (USD/CHF).

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